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Writers

Writing a book, script, or another type of creative document? Without an agreement in place, your collaborators could have an equal claim of ownership and rights to your content. Get this sorted out now and avoid expensive mistakes by using Cosynd to:

Quickly and easily outline what you and your collaborators own.

You may be asked to present ownership information for your copyrights to companies that want to sell or license your work, such as publishers, media firms, retailers etc. Having this information is critical, especially if you are going to bring your literary works to the mainstream. A split sheet agreement is a short and simple document that you can share with others to prove your ownership of your work.

Control who can license your content, use your name, image, brand and more.

When your collaborators aren't sure who has permission to license or sell your content, it can lead to your copyrights being used in a way that you wouldn't approve of and for fees that are lower than what you would expect. Taking the time to outline this now can help you to avoid serious legal and financial issues. Similarly, outlining how your name and likeness (moniker, images, and trademarks that represent you) can be used by your collaborators can help you to avoid serious damage to your brand.

Prevent others from having a claim on your work.

Unless otherwise stated, anyone that you collaborate with could potentially claim equal ownership of your copyrights, regardless of how small their contribution. If you're working with a freelancer/contractor that should not own a share of your copyrights, simply providing a payment may not be enough to prevent them from claiming ownership. A work for hire agreement clearly outlines the scope of the work to be done by your freelancer/contractor and waives any claim of ownership too.

Relying on the "Poor man's copyright" does not provide the same protection as registering with the U.S. Copyright Office. The difference is critical, particularly when it comes to finances and legal proceedings (when things go wrong, like they sometimes do). You are not eligible to file an infringement suit or recoup certain costs unless you have registered your works with the U.S. Copyright Office and doing so provides you with other significant benefits!